How TikTok Is Changing The Fashion Industry

By Isabelle Rust


Whether you are on TikTok or not, the app supplying us with endless 30 second videos has become unavoidable and addictive. Although the franchise faced the threat of it being banned in the US late last year, the impact it’s having on the fashion industry with its 800 million daily users is monumental. Due to this influx of interest, many of the classic A-list celebrities have been making an appearance on this platform, including Bella Hadid and JLo. With such famous icons joining this platform it has become a magnet for various fashion labels too, such as Saint Laurent and Louis Vuitton. These fashion brands are now beginning to live-stream their fashion shows and showcase their newest collections to attract a new generation. These such labels are endorsing various creators to use #TikTokFashionMonth alongside their own content to boost their appeal, which has helped this hashtag gain over 2 billion views and change the fashion industry.



TikTok is one of the only platforms where self-expression takes the forefront, eliminating the seeming pressure to post exclusively filtered and highly edited content that you typically see on other social media platforms. This is one of the driving factors for why TikTok is overtaking Instagram as the most used social media platform. TikTok’s easy-to-use video formatting tools and diverse trends allows creators to take their content to the next level. This has enabled diversity to be celebrated with the inclusion of plus-size creators wearing major fashion labels. The appeal of seeing ‘normal’ people style clothing is another reason why this platform is so memorising, hence why some of the most liked fashion related videos on TikTok are to do with styling. This illustrates the educational and practical element of fashion that everyone seems to be craving. For example, Camila Coelho, a Brazilian fashion stylist and creator regularly posts fashion hacks and styling videos all of which gain at least 3 million views.


The fashion audience on Tiktok is huge and the clothing brands have recognised this potential, hence why this platform is so heavily endorsing fashion-based content. Therefore, typically after one 30 second video goes viral, it can transform an individual’s life, especially if it is fashion based. This is exactly what Wisdom Kaye experienced after he began posting various videos of him walking down imaginary catwalks in the street whilst also wearing stylish outfits. From these clips alone, he has been signed with IMG Models where he now works with brands like Dior. Louis Powell, a similar fashion creator, also experienced his videos going viral too, which has now allowed him to walk on the most prestigious runways and wear clothes from the biggest fashion houses. These two are just one of many creators who have skyrocketed into stardom. Some say it’s down to luck if your video goes viral or due to the hashtags you use but who would know? I definitely haven’t shamelessly Google searched “How to get famous on TikTok” before…



TikTok mania is global and the fashion designers know it. Many of them jump on the latest trends whilst also showcasing their latest collections, accelerating the attraction the Gen Z have towards such aesthetics and brands. Balmains’ Olivier Rousteing is a great example of this where he demonstrates the process of creating a final product for Balmain through very satisfying video transitions. Prada has also followed suit by endorsing TikTok creators, such as Charlie D’Amelio, to sit front row of their latest fashion show. These sorts of fashion houses on TikTok are enabling fashion and styling to become more accessible to the millions, inspiring many young designers by hopefully setting an example for what the future fashion industry should look like.


Although the famous fashion houses are using the platform to harness the millions of daily users on TikTok, smaller businesses are being born onto it where they can also gain great success in their own right. This has helped the smaller sustainable fashion brands to attract additional potential customers from their sustainable content. #smallbusiness, #upcycle and #sustainability have over 20 billion views combined, which demonstrates how the younger generations place more importance towards supporting smaller brands and shopping more ethically. To give you all a bit of inspiration, here are my top three favourite small businesses on TikTok!


First up is Laura Grace (@lauraagraceee) who creates bespoke thrifted items that are sustainable. I particular like her mismatch tops and her bucket hat accessories, they are so trend for the coming spring.

Next up is Miranda Damolds (@mirandadamolds) who sells really fun clay homewear. All her products are brightly coloured which is something I love. My favourite item of hers, very predictively, is the lemon faced ashtray.

Finally, my last pick is a food based TikTok that I am obsessed with. Crowned Berry (@crownedberry) is one of a few companies that sell chocolate covered strawberries, but the aesthetics of her page are amazing. I am forever longing for a box of chocolate covered strawberries like these!!

All of the small and large businesses use the power of the hashtag which has enabled TikTok to be responsible for some of the biggest global fashion trends in 2020. These included tie-dying, cottage cardigans and the comeback of basically any 90s fashion items. This 90s fashion trend has helped revive some of the classic early-aughts brands, such as Juicy Couture from the global trending hashtag of #Y2KFashion. I thought most of the 2000s fashion trends were long gone but whether you like it or not, low-rise jeans are now starting to creep back in along with velvet tracksuits.


Whether you agree or not with TikTok and what it does, you cannot deny the impact it is having on the fashion industry and the certain trends that come in and out due to the creator’s indorsement and small business trends. If you are interested, go check out Lemon Fire’s TikTok for the behind the scenes of how to create what I do, @lemon_fire.